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Cardiovascular
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Almost 1 in 10 patients develop new persistent opioid use after cardiac surgery

Posted on June 17, 2020

Almost 1 in 10 patients developed new persistent opioid use after cardiac surgery, with those prescribed >300 oral morphine equivalents (mg) at an increased risk, according to a study published in JAMA Cardiology.

In this retrospective cohort study, data from 35,817 patients who were opioid-naive within 180 days before undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and heart procedures and filled an opioid prescription within 14 days after surgery, were included.

Opioid use occurred in 10.2% of patients undergoing CABG and 8.1% of valve surgery patients (P = .001).

There was an increased risk for developing persistent use among patients who were women; younger; with preoperative congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, diabetes, kidney failure, chronic pain, and alcoholism; and those taking preoperative benzodiazepines and muscle relaxants.

Researchers also noted an increased risk  use when patients were prescribed >300 oral morphine equivalents (mg) at discharged when compared with lower doses.

Reference

Brown CR, Chen Z, Khurshan F, et al. Development of persistent opioid use after cardiac surgery. JAMA Cardiol. Published online June 17, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.1445.

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